Jul 122020
 

CART’s first archaeological project investigating the Auxiliary Units was Coleshill Uncovered. 

As the headquarters of Auxiliary Units Coleshill House and Estate was known to have housed the training facilities and hosted many Auxiliers through the war. However the only previous investigation had been by the Ridgeway Military and Aviation Research Group (RMARG). They had made some significant finds, not least the demonstration Operational Base. They excavated the escape tunnel which had collapsed, creating a walk in entrance. They also found an observation post and possible ammunition bunker.

Coleshill Uncovered took a variety of approaches; 

The underground water tunnels, reportedly used by Auxiliary Units, were investigated

A survey of the site identified a number of structures not previously recorded.

Metal detecting revealed evidence of training and men living at the site.

Using a magnetometer allowed the OBs and demonstration hatches to be found.

Excavation revealed details about surviving structures that indicated their design and construction.

Some of the highlights were;

  • The discovery of a bayonet concealed in wall close to where the escape tunnel of the demonstration OB exited. Once a stone was removed it could be retrieved. It is thought this was was part of the demonstration of how to prepare for the worst, but it is remarkable to think this had stayed on place for so long.
  • The uncovering of a number of demonstration hatch covers, showing the range of designs in use. It was remarkable to be able to match one of these to the plans handed out as part of the Patrol Leader’s Course at Coleshill to men from across the country
  • Being able to see the internal layout in one of the Nissen huts due to marks left on the concrete floor, once a mat of vegetation had been rolled back
  • Finding identifiable fragments from an aircraft and a German artillery piece, which confirmed verbal accounts of Coleshill in wartime which had been recounted to the National Trust staff by visitors over the years.

CART hosts the reports from this series of studies and also images of all the finds

Project Stage One and Stage Two

As an extra for the Festival we have uploaded some previously unseen images of the excavations

Please do comment on the photos, particularly if you see something unusual or can help identify something.

The Finds Register is useful to have open while you browse the finds images. 

And as another extra, we have a report on the Firing Range with its supplement

More recent visits to the site have not revealed any additional finds, though we do have a wartime image now of what is believed to be the same location.

Jul 112020
 

For the first day of the Festival we at CART would like to introduce you to archaeology as it relates to the Auxiliary Units. 

Conflict Archaeology is the term used for the archaeology of modern warfare, typically of the 20th Century. It also includes the wealth of material, including personal accounts of use, from those that were involved with locations.  This is somethig that rarely if ever exists for more ancient sites. It considers more than just what can be dug up, including how sites are perceived over time.

Until quite recently, structures left over from the Second World War were generally considered eyesores, something to be cleared out of the way to get to the actual archaeology from hundreds of years ago. However, archaeological techniques can be applied to excavating wartime structures.  It can uncover information that has otherwise been lost, despite being in the recent past. 

When we think about Auxiliary Units perhaps the most obvious structures are the underground Operational Bases (OBs). Yet we know relatively little about when most were built, and even less about how they were built. We have a couple of documents showing designs, yet almost all OBs differ in some way. 

But Auxiliary Units did not spend all of their time underground, in fact documentary and personal accounts indicate quite the opposite. They had training centres and headquarters, and practiced their skills against various military structures.

Defence of Britain logo

If we start at the beginning, perhaps the first attempt to apply some archaeological process to the Auxiliary Units story was the Defence of Britain Project. This aimed to document the location and type of all wartime sites in Britain, with some basic information and in some cases images or measurements, or other written evidence. It ran between 1995 and 2001 and although administered by the Council for British Archaeology, the fieldwork was almost entirely done by volunteers without any formal training. There was no follow up investigation of the sites by excavation or any other means. The result was a database that is still available to search online.

https://archaeologydataservice.ac.uk/archives/view/dob/

As part of CART’s history, this was an important project as it put researchers interested in Auxiliary Units from around the country in touch with others working cooperatively with a common purpose. Many of those original Defence of Britain volunteers are members of CART or have contributed information to this website.

Probably the first formal archaeological report on an Auxiliary Units site came from Wales. We would like to thank Martin Locock, the author for permission to host a copy here. 

An Auxiliary Unit ‘hide’ (Operational Base) at Cilybebyll, Neath Port Talbot. Archaeology in Wales 40 (2000), 57-59.

With decades of hindsight, we now know that the alcove described most likely would have housed an Elsan toilet, and that the winch mechanism was for the door. This highlights how knowledge alters the interpretation of the same findings. The Royal Observer Corps underground bunkers of the post-war era, were equipped with radio aerials that could be elevated by winding them up from inside. These structures had no need to be completely concealed from an enemy, as they were designed for monitoring nuclear fall out. We know now that Auxiliary Units had better ways to conceal an aerial from even close scrutiny, described in the Special Duties part of this website.

This was the Operational Base for the Pontarwarde Patrol

Martin Locock has his own award winning archaeology blog with top tips for project managers

http://10simplesteps.blogspot.com/

In Essex in 2006, came one of the first formal archaeologial excavations of an Operational Base. Based on a accounts of a structure and the presence of a depression, a small excavation revealed eveidence of the structure.

The report can be read here

https://archaeologydataservice.ac.uk/archiveDS/archiveDownload?t=arch-4…

Further information was recorded in a subsequent project documenting World War Two Heritage in Essex

https://www.worldwar2heritage.com/en/page/9069/190/British-Resistance-H…

Some additional Images are in the Essex Sites and Monuments Register

https://www.heritagegateway.org.uk/Gateway/Results_Single.aspx?uid=MEX1…

Read the CART Patrol report here, with the men fully identified for the first time

https://www.staybehinds.com/patrol/maldon-patrol

The site is now being preserved and hopefully its Auxiliary Units history can be incorporated in the future interpretation at the site.

Rather a nice example of the extended scope of Conflict Archaeology. We don’t just have the report of the excavation, but this prompted accounts of the use of the site to come to light. Providing publicly accessible reports brought forward more information over time.  The presence of a boat in the mill race as a getaway vehicle was empheral and could never have been deduced from excavation. Yet it explains the structure, specifically why the escape tunnel was built to open into the Mill Race. For the modern volunteers restoring the Mill, it provides an alternative way to interpret the structure and an additional element to the history of the site.

We’ll be back with more for Day 2 tomorrow

Jul 062020
 

The website will now go ‘LIVE” on 11th July. Sneak preview late on 9th or 10th July. Thanks for your support.

The new Website launch will coincide with the online Archaeology Festival hosted by the Council For British Archaeology.

To whet your appetite, here’s our new video highlighting some our more recent archaeological projects: https://youtu.be/WCJjan8CWLo

Jul 052020
 

Official Launch date: 9th July

We have been working tirelessly for the past few years on a new website, and are now in a position to launch. The official date is the 9th of July, but as email subscribers you get a sneak preview from the 7th July: www.staybehinds.com

While it’s not quite the finished article, we have compiled more Auxiliers in one place than has ever been achieved anywhere before (we’re quite proud of that). We have over 6000 names, and if you know someone we’ve left off, please get in touch.

We’ll be adding information over the coming months, including photographs, info on the Special Duties Branch, Coleshill House & Estate and Auxiliary Unit links with the SAS and SOE. If you notice any errors on the new site please contact us.

A huge shout out of thanks to everyone who has supported us over the years, and continues to support us. It really is appreciated – CART is a ‘not-for-profit’ organisation run by just a handful of enthusiasts. Thank you one and all.

To whet your appetite, here’s a brand new video brought to you by CART highlighting some of the archaeological projects we have been involved with: https://youtu.be/WCJjan8CWLo

We’ve chosen our new website launch to coincide with the digital Festival Of Archaeology running from the 11th to the 19th July, hosted by the Council for British Archaeology (CBA): https://festival.archaeologyuk.org

Jul 032020
 

Bill was part of the Long Bredy Operational Patrol in Dorset.

SALISBURY William (Bill) Peacefully at Park House Care Home on 3rd April 2020, aged 95 years. Beloved husband of Jean, father to Lyn, Carol and Ian, grandfather to Emma & Luke, Michelle, Mark & Natalie, Craig & Matthew, Nathan and Charlie and great grandfather to Jake, Ivy & Oliver and Celine.

Bill visited us 2016 at the Broadmayne D5 show. You can read the Long Bredy Patrol report here: https://www.coleshillhouse.com/long-bredy-auxiliary-unit-patrol.php

Jun 092020
 

Look out this week (11th) for History of War Magazine. https://www.facebook.com/HistoryofWarMag/

They are including a piece on the Auxiliary Units covering everything from the creation of the very first units (initially named the XII Corps Observation Unit) under Peter Fleming (brother of Ian Fleming, creator of James Bond), to how they were trained in ‘thuggery’ and the types of weapons that made up their rather impressive arsenals! Make sure you pick up a copy!

May 082020
 

Throughout the day we will be posting a few stories from Auxiliary Unit Patrol members and their memories on Facebook.

Search for: British Resistance Archive – Churchill’s Auxiliary Units or click on this picture-link below:

Obviously by May 1945 the Patrols had been stood down; however, many still had possession of a large amount of explosives, which created memorable firework celebrations!

Others were returning from fighting in Europe with Special Forces, or finding themselves in European countries having helped liberate them, or in hospital recovering from wounds received in the course of victory. We hope you all have a safe and peaceful VE Day and weekend!

#VEDay#AuxUnits#WW2#May1945#WeWillRemember

Apr 262020
 

With the aid of local researchers during lock-down, we have a couple of photographs from Milford Haven of the Memorial to Hubert William ‘Stokey’ Lewis V.C. of the Milford Haven Patrol. (https://www.coleshillhouse.com/milford-auxiliary-unit-and-operational-base.php)

Whilst there they also saw a memorial to his son. Vernon Lewis was a Flight Sergeant in the RAF. He was tragically killed in his Lancaster over Germany in August 1943 at the age of just 22.

We know of some Memorials around the country, but if you know of any to your local Auxiliers or Patrols, we’d love to hear from you and document them.

Apr 202020
 

We are all going a bit stir-crazy at the moment not being able to get out and about properly. All summer events have been cancelled, but that’s not stopping us researching and working on the new website.

We are increasing our activity on Facebook. Lots of interesting people and places to check out. Do take a look. We are having a lot of great comments and interactions. Search for British Resistance Archive or click on the link below:

Get ‘click-happy’ here: https://www.facebook.com/staybehinds/?epa=SEARCH_BOX

The latest post is about a Welsh Auxilier who won the Victoria Cross. You can scroll back to view previous posts too.

Mar 152020
 

Unfortunately due to the global COVID-19 virus outbreak all current CART public events are postponed until further notice.

In other news, behind the scenes work is progressing well on our new website. There is a huge amount of data to transfer, so bare with us. It will be worth it as the new site will have more information and will be easier to navigate. We will preserve the legacy of the brave Auxiliers.