Mar 102019
 

2019 marks 75 years since the official Stand Down of the Auxiliary Units, and the 10th anniversary of CART research

Here are some of the events we are hoping to attend (subject to confirmation):

April 13th & 14th: Castletown at War, D-Day Museum, Portland, Dorset www.castletownddaycentre.com

April 14th: Coleshill O.B. Open Day, Coleshill House, Oxfordshire www.nationaltrust.org.uk/the-buscot-and-coleshill-estates/features/coleshills-second-world-war-secrets

May 25th & 26th: Nothe Fort, Weymouth 1940’s Weekend, Dorset https://nothefort.org.uk/news-events/1940s-home-front-family-weekend?occurrenc eID=311

May 12th: Coleshill O.B. Open Day, Coleshill House, Oxfordshire www.nationaltrust.org.uk/the-buscot-and-coleshill-estates/features/coleshills-second-world-war-secrets

June 8th & 9th: Southwick, D-Day Revival (also 75 years), Hampshire www.southwickrevival.co.uk

June 9th: Coleshill O.B. Open Day, Coleshill House, Oxfordshire www.nationaltrust.org.uk/the-buscot-and-coleshill-estates/features/coleshills-second-world-war-secrets

June 22nd & 23rd: The Axe Vale Show, Axminster, Devon www.axevaleshow.com/axevale-show-2019

June 30th: Hazelbury Mill, Military Vehicle event, Somerset http://www.haselburymill.co.uk/events-1

July 6th & 7th: Chickerell Steam & Vintage Show, Weymouth, Dorset www.chickerellsteamshow.uk

July 14th: Coleshill O.B. Open Day, Coleshill House, Oxfordshire www.nationaltrust.org.uk/the-buscot-and-coleshill-estates/features/coleshills-second-world-war-secrets

Aug 18th: The Mid Somerset Show, Somerset www.midsomersetshow.org.uk/

Sept 8th: Coleshill O.B. Open Day, Coleshill House, Oxfordshire www.nationaltrust.org.uk/the-buscot-and-coleshill-estates/features/coleshills-second-world-war-secrets

September: Coleshill WW2 weekend, Coleshill, Oxfordshire WATCH THIS SPACE – this is going to be a BIG event: Coleshill House is where the Aux Units underwent their specialist training 1940 – 1944

The whole of the Granary will be filled by CART, The Scallywags, BROM (British Resistance Organisation Museum) and The Bob Millard (Aux Patrol member) Collection, marking 75 years since the Auxiliary Units were officially stood down… more information to follow…

Jan 012019
 

New Year Greetings from all at CART, we wish you a Healthy & Happy 2019.

This year we plan to bring you a new website experience which will include a huge amount of patrol updates through an easier and more accessible interface. 

Research continues as we rediscover lost bunkers, record and photograph them (with proper permissions) and reveal the stories of their patrol members.

We are finding out more about the early radio operators of the Special Duties side of the organisation, and lights are also being thrown on Auxiliary Unit links with SOE and the SAS.

We are currently drawing up a short-list of the events we hope to attend during 2019. Watch out for updates, and come along and say hi.

Thank you for your continued support.

Nov 292018
 

. . . Sir Winston Leonard Spencer-Churchill was born.

In the early summer of 1940 Churchill would instigate the formation of the secret ‘Auxiliary Units’ due to the threat of a German invasion. ‘Irregular warfare’ was already being researched and what existed was amalgamated into a civilian network of Operational Patrols (guerillas & saboteurs) and a Special Duties Branch consisting of spies, messengers & wireless radio-operators should invasion and occupation have taken place.

Born into a well-connected family in Blenheim Palace in Oxfordshire, Churchill would go on to have a contentious political and military career. He escaped from a Boer War POW camp, lectured around the world, was an artist and published historian. As an MP he held many important ministerial positions. He served in WW1 before going back to politics.

On 10th May 1940, the same day that Hitler invaded the Low Countries, Winston Churchill became Prime Minister.

Images Wikipedia

Churchill’s secret ‘Auxiliary Units’ were stood-down in 1944.




Nov 182018
 

It’s been a busy few days for the CART team!

Our Press Officer Andrew Chatterton delivered a talk to the Newton Poppleford Local Historical Society. Also our Devon researcher, Nina Hannaford brought along a display with information on the local patrols and Special Duties Branch which went down really well.

We already have a couple of new leads for both the Aux Units and Special Duties Branch in East Devon as a result.

Thanks to all who attended and the generous donations !




Nov 062018
 

On Sunday 11 November, the National Service of Remembrance will be held at the Cenotaph on Whitehall, London.

Starting at 11am, the service will commemorate the contribution of British and Commonwealth military and civilian servicemen and women involved in the two World Wars and later conflicts.

This year, Remembrance Sunday falls on the 100th anniversary of the end of the First World War. Many of the Auxiliary Unit Patrol Leaders were First World War veterans.

At the moment there will be 14 marching (watch out for D25), a mixture of relatives and CART researchers: David Hancock, Roger Green, Charlie Hancock, Polly Hancock, Paul Jarvis, Alan Jarvis, James Miners, Michael Miners, Philip Merricks, Robert Macaulay, David Macaulay, Jim Gascoyne, Wallace John Hewett and Anita Griggs.

“We will remember them”

 




Jul 082016
 

Barbara Marion CulletonWe are sad to announce the death of Barbara Marion Culleton who passed away peacefully on Sunday 19th June at Maise House, the Royal British Legion Nursing Home, Bexhill-on-Sea.

In 1933 aged 15 Barbara Culleton arrived in London on her own and found digs and secretarial work.

On the 9th September 1938 the Women’s Branch of the British Army the ‘Auxiliary Territorial Service’ was formed. Within two months Barbara had enlisted into Princess Louise’s Kensington Regiment as a volunteer (as ATS privates were then called).

The day before war was declared she was embodied into the Army and was posted to the War Station Railway Training Centre at Longmore and remembers having to help put rolling stock back on the tracks.

It was in July 1941 while she was at her next posting to 12 Field Training Regiment RA at Bordon that she was first Interviewed and told that she had been selected to become an officer. She was asked to consider being involved in training for ‘urgent, very secret and possibly dangerous’ work.

READ THE REST OF HER CAREER IN AUXILIARY UNITS HERE.

On the 3rd May 1955 Captain Barbara Culleton WRAC was awarded the Territorial Decoration for serving her Country. She continued to serve until 12 December 1968 when she reached the upper age limit and so reluctantly had to leave. Barbara Culleton had served her Country for 30 years.

We will remember them.




Jun 272016
 

Chirnside 1 Special Duties Branch Out Station 5

Today we have added an extensive update to the previous report on the Special Duties Branch hidden radio hide codenamed ‘Chirnside 1‘.

Thanks to the very kind new owners our team were allowed in to record this most rare of top secret WW2 locations.

Take a video tour inside the hide, hidden under an outside privy, and read the full report here. 

Our thanks to Dr Will Ward, Martyn Allen, Nina Hannaford and Chris Perry for their cracking work to get this online.




May 212016
 

image

Inside the WWII secret wireless station, or IN-Station in Norwich, which has just been protected as a scheduled monument. The entrance to the third chamber, which is where the escape tunnel begins from © Norfolk Historic Environment Service.A secret Second World War bunker built on the orders of Winston Churchill lay hidden under a Thorpe St Andrew estate for almost 70 years.

A secret Second World War bunker built on the orders of Winston Churchill lay hidden under a Thorpe St Andrew estate for almost 70 years.

Its entrance is behind a bookcase, its aerial was disguised in a tree with the feeder cable under the bark, and there was an escape tunnel in case its operatives were discovered.

Now the underground wireless station, on private land at Pinebanks, off Yarmouth Road, has been protected as a scheduled monument by the government on the advice of Historic England.

The rare IN-Station, also known as a Zero Station, was part of a mysterious secret wireless network operated mostly by civilian agents.

Wireless stations were set up in 1940 by Winston Churchill in response to the increasing threat of German invasion.

Pinebanks in Norwich picture by Adrian Judd for EN

Pinebanks in Norwich picture by Adrian Judd for EN

It is thought that just 32 of the bunkers were built in England during the Second World War, with just a dozen discovered so far and the Pinebanks bunker is one of the most intact examples.

The station, which received messages from OUT-Stations in enemy-occupied areas, was found by a retired groundsman in the gardens of Pinebanks in 2012.

It has now been awarded special protected status to preserve it and to celebrate its history.

Heritage minister David Evennett said: “This underground wireless station is a rare and unusual example of our Second World War heritage and deserves to be protected.

“It is a reminder too of the often forgotten role so many civilians played in the war effort often acting in secret and undercover.”

The recruits in Churchill’s Secret Army, also known as the British Resistance Organisation, had to verbally swear to secrecy, with one hand on a Bible. In some cases even their families knew nothing of the role that required them to leave their homes regularly at night.

Historic England’s Tony Calladine said: “This amazing place that has survived intact played a highly secret but vitally important role in preparing us for a feared invasion during the Second World War. Because so much information about the stations was either hidden or destroyed, this small but significant dugout has great potential to teach us about a relatively little-known area of our 20th century military history.”

A spokesman for Ocubis Ltd, development manager for site owner Berliet Ltd, said: “We have been liaising with BDC and Historic England and, as we have always stated, will ensure the setting of this historically important former Norwich WW2 IN-station in Thorpe St Andrew is preserved.”

It is thought that the bunker was built under the Jarrold family’s tennis court at Pinebanks in the 1940s.

Details only emerged after the family’s former gardener, who had to sign the Official Secrets Act, told a young groundsman about the construction work he had witnessed.

The gardener did not disclose this until after his retirement, and he did not reveal the location, with this emerging later.

Winston Churchill had set up a secret army unit called GHQ Auxillary Units with a particular branch known as Special Duties, and wireless stations were built as part of this.

Civilian volunteers living in the most threatened coastal areas of the country were trained to spy and report on German military activities from within occupied areas, with their messages received by IN-Stations like the one at Pinebanks.

Details about their locations and construction were kept secret and very little documentation of the stations exists.

Information was protected in case they should be needed again in the future.

Historic England is asking the public to come forward with information about family members who were trained to be civilian spies, or any clues as to where the remaining 20 IN-stations lay hidden.

Email communications@HistoricEngland.org.uk

Report by Sam Russell (Eastern Daily Press)

SEE THE FULL REPORT ON THIS LOCATION HERE. 




Jul 012015
 

Captain Ken WardCaptain Ken Ward was an integral part of the development of the Special Duties Branch (A secret radio network set up around the country to broadcast German movements post invasion).

Ken was a Royal Signals Adjutant who started work in the SDB with 16 other radio hams. Ken made the radio sets before installing them in the coast stations. He then taught the operators how to use them as well as maintaining them.

Once installed teams of 2 would go out from wherever they were based and visit the stations, change and charge the batteries.

Problems with the early radio sets resulted in Ken agreeing to make a new one. In about 3 weeks flat he had produced the TRD, which was an all in one box.

Our thanks to research by Bill Ashby & Ken’s daughter Kate for this bio.

Read more about Ken’s military career and Aux work here.




Jun 222015
 

Copyright Katie Hart - Just Regional

Copyright Katie Hart – Just Regional

Jill Monk from Aylsham in Norfolk has passed away at the age of 89.

During the war Jill worked for the Special Duties Branch (part of the Aux Units) as a message courier for her father’s secret radio station. This was cleverly hidden in the coal hole of the family house at Aylsham where he was a doctor.

Jill would be sent out at night, commonly on horseback, to deliver any messages they had received. The messages were hidden inside split tennis balls and deposited via a disguised pipe. Jill had two horses, one chestnut, for riding during the day, and one black, for night exercises when she would ride cross-country.

See more about her work below.


Towards the end of the war Jill became a radar operator at the Chain Home Radar Station in Stoke Holy Cross. In 1946, she competed at the Aylsham Show on her then favourite mount, Merry Monarch, a horse she had also favoured, because of its dark coat colour, when out at night delivering secret messages. She remained a regular competitor at the Aylsham Show for many years, first as a horse rider and later as a judge and sponsor of the Highland Pony in-hand classes.

Her remarkable story is catalogued both in ‘With Britain in Mortal Danger’ and ‘Churchill’s Underground Army‘ by John Warwicker or you can read our interview with her here.